• Ayalá

9 Tips for Sharing Yoga with Children and Families Online

The Covid-19 pandemic created a situation whereby me and many others fellow yoga teachers had to move our teaching and our classes from the studios to online platforms.

Despite of the initial teething problems of moving my classes online, I quickly realised that online classes enabled me to continue and maintain the connection I had with children and families and support them during these challenging times.

If done correctly, running an online class feels as if we are all sharing a virtual space together filled with love and magic.


I have also noticed that children and families are keen to connect and are happy to interact and have the sessions which are as interactive as possible.


To be able to make their yoga experience meaningful, accessible and safe and for your classes to become more than just another ‘TV show’ for the children,

The Covid-19 pandemic created a situation whereby me and many others fellow yoga teachers had to move our teaching and our classes from the studios to online platforms.

Despite of the initial teething problems of moving my classes online, I quickly realised that online classes enabled me to continue and maintain the connection I had with children and families and support them during these challenging times.

If done correctly, running an online class feels as if we are all sharing a virtual space together filled with love and magic.


I have also noticed that children and families are keen to connect and are happy to interact and have the sessions which are as interactive as possible.


To be able to make their yoga experience meaningful, accessible and safe and for your classes to become more than just another ‘TV show’ for the children, I have put together some very useful tips to help you run children and family yoga classes online.


1. Know Your Audience

This is a very tricky one, especially if you open your classes to a wide audience and therefore you might have new children or new families joining in.

While during a regular yoga session in a studio you will likely have some kind of a health declaration that every parent will need to fill in prior to the class or you will be able to discuss certain health condition with parents face to face, with an open online class you won’t be able to know if there are any special health conditions you should pay attention to (unless you ask parents to sign up a health declaration form prior to the class).

Even more so, if an adult is joining in (for example a family yoga class or even at a children’s class) you won’t be able to know if the said adult has any existing health conditions which might impact their practice.


Therefore, in family yoga sessions, keep it simple.

At the start of the class, remind everyone that they need to be very mindful of their body, any health issues and how they move in the poses and between the practices.

Give as many options as possible for the yoga poses to make the practice accessible to all levels. I personally leave Acro Yoga out of the equation, especially if I don’t know the families and whether it is their first time.

2. Keep Them Engaged

Having you on the screen creates a situation where children tend to stare at the screen as if it is just another TV show.

Try to keep them engaged by bringing their attention and awareness back from the screen to their bodies and their partners.

Give as many body cues as you can to bring their attention back to their bodies and off the screen.

For example: In a cow/cat tilt, invite the children to move their backs in different directions, (I tend to call it ‘Disco Cat’) and to explore the sensation in their backs. Ask them if they can feel the different parts of their backs as they move it.

In a family yoga session, create as many opportunities as you can for the participants to look and interact with each another. Let them know that you will guide them and that all they need to do is to listen to you rather than to watch you.

Remember, you are a space holder, even if it is a virtual space.

3. Zoom In and Zoom Out.

During the class, be as dynamic as possible. Change your position from just demonstrating the practices to moving closer to the screen, so you can truly interact with what the children and the families are doing. Let the children feel that you are there for them, and that the session is more than just showing practices on a flat screen but rathe more alive and interactive. Set yourself a small chair next to the camera and smoothly move between the chair and the mat to keep the audience engaged. Just seeing you from different angles and different distances would make the audience feel that you are there for them and not just running a scripted class.

In family yoga sessions via Zoom for example, I show my interest in the actual practice and connection the participants have with each another by commenting on their moves.

4. Create Space for Curiosity and Creativity.

The live stream sessions create a fantastic opportunity to stimulate children’s and families creativity and curiosity. When sharing a practice, explain the practice verbally and then ask the children to share their interpretations. This again, will keep them engaged and curious of the way the session is going. You can then continue the session based on the personal interpretations of the pose to show how the pose should be done.

For example: In family yoga session, I offer a pose and ask the families to find a way to perform it with their partner as they see fit. I make it clear that there are no rights or wrongs, just endless possibilities. In that way, the families interact between themselves rather than being focused only on the screen, and also tap their creative minds. How wonderful is that?

5. Be as Interactive as You Can

The beauty of online platform such as Zoom is that you can see your audience. It makes the 2 way communication much easier that platform such as YouTube where there is no immediate feedback by the participants.

During my sessions, I ask for thumbs up if they understood an instruction, or if they can hear me or the music I play well.

I found that allocating few minutes discussion time is extremely valuable.

I tend to leave time for discussions both at the beginning of the session and at the end. I am always intrigued to hear children’s thoughts and ideas. The advantage of the online platform is that even shy children, who normally will not talk during a face to face session, can join in by using the chat box.

Saying that, I am aware that it is really depends on the ages of the children participating in the class and if the parents are there. For a group of up to ten children, I give children and families the chance to unmute themselves, and share their thoughts. I do that by asking them to raise a hand and after calling the name of the child or the family, they can unmute themselves. In that way everyone can get an opportunity to talk if they wish to.

It is all about creating a safe space within any platform for everyone to share their experiences and thoughts.

6. Relaxation Time

When you take them through relaxation time at the end of the class, keep yourself in an upright position and let them know that you are going to stay like that throughout the relaxation so you can see how they are doing. Some of the children and the families will be out of your sight as they will lie down outside the area the camera captures and therefore I always give enough time to come out of the relaxation. Leave time to chat afterward, do another breathing practice to make sure you let them get out of the session grounded.

7. Setting

Be aware of the setting of the room where you do the classes. Make the space behind you as clear as possible.

Children are very curious and would love to see and explore all that there is to see on your screen. Therefore, do your best to offer your sessions in a space where there are as less objects around you as possible.

Also mention to families that they want to make sure that there is enough space for them to stand, sit and move around.

8. Privacy

Privacy is a sensitive topic to everyone today, especially to anyone working with your children.

I don’t take any photos or screenshots of my Zoom sessions and in the beginning of any class I ask the participants no to do so either. Children and families are practising in their homes, and taking a screenshot of their private space is almost as intruding their homes without asking for permission. In addition, to post photos of children online on social media without parental consent is problematic to say the least so be very mindful how you promote your online sessions on social media.

9. Smile

Smile, smile and don’t forget to smile.

There is a saying: “When you smile at the world, the world smiles back at you”.

In my experience this saying applies even more so to online classes.

Keep smiling during these classes and people will remember your smile.

They will appreciate it and will smile back at you.

Smiling shows your personality and it is a great way to show that you care, lift their mood and create a real connection with everyone in the class.

That is it from my end dear ones.


We are all in this together and it is a very interesting learning curve.

I would love to hear from you and if you have any more useful tips to make children’s and family sessions enjoyable and safe online please share them with me.